History

History

Liberty Recycling has its roots in the traditional clothes markets in the Liberties in Dublin. This tradition was harnessed to develop a training and employment initiative to assist people in the local community affected by drugs. Initially set up under Merchants Quay Ireland with 8 people Liberty Recycling is now an independent company with charitable status employing over 65 people.

Timeline

2017
2017

2016

President Higgins presents the annual awards cermony, in which trainees are rewarded for their participation in external and in-house training throughout the year
2017

2015

School collections increase by 30%
2017

2014

A younger clientele start coming to the project
2017

2013

Recruitment of Rehabilitation Supervisor
2017

2012

Redesign of clothing banks to prevent stealing of clothes
2017

2011

RTE Capital D program features Liberty Recycling on upcycling
2017

2010

Opening of first charity shop on Camden Street
2017

2009

The President of Ireland Mary McAleese presents nearly 100 certified awards at the Annual Training Awards ceremony
2017

2008

Following several grant applications, pilot funding is secured for the provision of a support worker to deliver comprehensive rehabilitation support
2017

2006

The project receives Quality Assurance from Fetac and partners with the VEC to offer participants the opportunity to gain a Major Award at Level 3 in-house
2017

2005

The project, now a Fetac Accredited Training Centre, is officially launched by Minister of State Noel Ahern
2017

2004

A fire destroys the Basin Lane premises and briefly threatens the survival of the project. However larger and improved premises are found in Bluebell and funding is secured through the Ballyfermot Drugs Task Force. Liberties Recycling now caters for 50 trainees
2017

2002

The project, now with 20 participants, buys new equipment and moves into its ‘new’ premises in Basin Lane. It is established as a fully independent Drugs Project with the support of FAS and the South Inner City, Ballyfermot and Canal Communities Drug Task Forces
2017

2000

Liberties Recycling is set up under Merchant’s Quay Ireland as a FAS sponsored Community Employment scheme with 8 trainees. The project opens a charity shop on Meath Street. Saint Vincent De Paul, Age Action and the Irish Cancer Society supply surplus clothing from their charity shops to the project
2017

1999

A group led by Philip Moloney come together with the idea of involving the community in a clothes recycling initiative to provide employment and training to local people affected by drugs
2017

1995

The Market closes for redevelopment. However, the Moloney family is determined to continue the tradition of trading in used clothes in the Liberties
2017

1902

The Iveagh Market is built in Dublin’s Liberties by the Earl of Iveagh to give the people a dry place to sell their second hand goods